Business Chinese Vocabulary List: Job titles and positions

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Do you want to use Mandarin Chinese professionally?

Then you wouldn’t want to call your boss or client by the wrong title right?

To help you get this sorted out, we’ve put together a business Chinese vocabulary list on job …

Essential Chengyu: To see someone in a new light – 刮目相看

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Do you know anyone who went to China and came back speaking fluent Chinese, making you look at them in a whole new light?

Or are you in China right now and want to wow everyone when you go back …

Essential Chengyu: If you’ve ever spilled coffee before – 粗心大意

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Do you know anyone who’s really careless?

Perhaps they’re always spilling something, forgetting dates, or bumping into things?

Perhaps that person is you (I know it’s me)?

Here’s a chengyu to describe that person: 粗心大意(cū xīn dà yì).

粗心大意(cū xīn

Essential Chengyu: Like a fish in water – 如鱼得水

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Do you ever have those moments when you know your Chinese is on?

When you almost feel like you were born to speak Chinese?

When you feel like a fish in water?

If so, or if you’re

Essential Chengyu: If you want to become fluent, don’t 半途而废

essential-chengyu-if-you-want-to-become-fluent-dontgiveup

Is there a shortcut to Chinese fluency?

If you’ve been reading our blog, you probably know our position already: no. There are ways to learn faster or better, but to really get fluent, there is one key condition: you have …

Chinese Slang: “Leftover Girls” and “Diamond Wangs”

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We couldn’t make this up if we tried.

A new Chinese slang word has emerged in recent years that literally means “leftover girls.” It’s used to describe urban women who enjoy a high level of education, income, IQ, and have …

Essential Chengyu: Another way to say “Cute”

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It’s time that you learned another way to say “cute” aside from “可爱 (kě ‘ ài),” which you probably learned in first year Chinese. How about something more nuanced – like “dainty”: 小鸟依人 (xiǎoniǎoyīrén)?

小鸟依人 (xiǎoniǎoyīrén) basically means that someone