Archive | 2011

Remember to do this in 2012

What will your 2012 be like? A pivotal year with big decisions to be made? If so, don’t forget to take a moment to 深思熟虑 (shēn sī shú lǜ). 深思熟虑 (shēn sī shú lǜ) means to think deeply and carefully about something. It’s a positive Chinese idiom.  A breakdown of the characters in 深思熟虑(shēn sī shú lǜ): 深 (shēn): deep (eg. 深入 – shēnrù - deep or thorough) 思 (sī): to think or contemplate (eg. 思考 – sīkǎo) 熟 (shú): normally means

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Chinese idiom for 12 year old CEO

Did you hear about the 12 year old Chinese CEO? Tian Zhonghe taught himself how to program. Then he disguised his voice to hire a team of 11 employees. Then he raised 2,000 Yuan and earned 30,000 in 4 months. But then tragedy struck: his voice disguising software malfunctioned. His team left him. His empire collapsed as quickly as it began. Though he’s young, it’s safe to say that Tian already has wide experience and broad knowledge. He has experienced

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Chinese Slang: The Naked Series

Do you know the 3 nakeds in Chinese slang? If not, would you like to get to know them?   Chinese Slang’s Naked #1: 裸婚 (luǒ hūn) – “Naked Wedding” It means getting married with nothing but a wedding certificate and literally means “naked (裸 – luǒ) wedding (婚 - hūn).” Perhaps the best way to explain this is in Chinese: “结婚无房无车无钻戒, 不办婚礼不蜜月” “jiéhūn wú fáng wú chē wú zuànjiè, bú bàn hūnlǐ bú mìyuè” “To get married without a house, a car, a diamond

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Boost your Chinese vocabulary through Themed Word Lists

To become fluent in Chinese, a large vocabulary is obviously key. And for a strong vocabulary, there’s no substitute for hard work. But if you’re studying hard, why not also learn more effectively? Here’s a simple tip for learning vocab faster: themed Chinese vocab word lists.  A themed Chinese vocab word list is basically a list of words about a certain theme, along with their English translation. Themed Chinese vocab lists can be extremely powerful because: you immediately understand the

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Chinese idiom: Give an inch and they’ll take a yard

There are tough negotiators. And then there are people who you can’t give any concessions to. Give them an inch and they’ll take a yard. Or as the Chinese would say, they would 得寸进尺 (dé cùn jìn chǐ). 得寸进尺 (dé cùn jìn chǐ) describes someone who’s so greedy that if you give them a little bit, they’ll come right back and ask for much more. It’s more or less similar to “get an inch and take a yard,” except that the

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Chinese idiom for a drop in the bucket

The Chinese also have an idiom for “just a drop in the bucket.” Except it involves cows. And hair. 九牛一毛 (jiǔ niú yì máo) literally means “9 cows and 1 strand of cow hair” and it indicates something that’s so small that it’s like one strand of cow hair among 9 cows.  A breakdown of the characters in 九牛一毛(jiǔ niú yì máo): 九 (jiǔ): nine 牛 (niú): cow 一 (yì): one 毛 (máo): hair Usage 1) As a Noun. Example 1

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Chinese Vocab Word List: Christmas and New Year’s

This Chinese vocabulary word list has everything from “Santa” to “wrapping paper” to “New Year’s resolutions.” Hope you find it useful this holiday season!   Christmas – People or Tangible Objects angel —— 天使 —— tiān shǐ Bethlehem —— 伯利恒 —— bó lì héng candle —— 蜡烛 —— là zhú candy cane —— 拐杖糖 —— guǎi zhàng táng cellophane —— 玻璃纸 —— bō li zhǐ chimney —— 烟囱 —— yān cōng Christmas card —— 圣诞卡 —— shèng dàn kǎ Christmas Day —— 圣诞节 —— shèng dàn jié Christmas Eve —— 平安夜/圣诞节前夕

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